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Full text of "Old houses and families of Carlisle, Mass., 1941"

Vol. XXIV 

The Frank E. Wilkins House page 1 

Residence of James H. Wilkins " 34 

12 Illustrations 



- ^777- 



EOBBINS-WILKINS HOUSE 
Acton and Westford Streets 

Historical Sketch 

Timothy Wilkins , a "Forty-Niner" 

John (4) Robbins Family 

Timothy (6) Wilkins Family 

Receipt by Thomas Hodgman 

John (7) Wilkins Family 

Timothy (6) Wilkins Family 

William Wilkins Family 

Pratt Lineal Record 

Abijah Warren Monroe Family 

Wilkins Probate Numbers 

The Wilkins Tall Clock 

Poem by J. Stanley 

The Melodion 

A Right to a Church Horse Shed 

Frank E. Wilkins Line 

George E. Wilkins Line 

John ^ray Wilkins Line 

Andrew Wilkins Line 

Simon Wheeler Family 

Wheeler Records 



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FRANK WILKINS house, 
probably built by Capt. Aaron Robbins in 1830. 

The land on which this house stands, was in 1748 a part of the 
farm of thirty acres owned by Oliver and Mary ( "Pa-v- ke>~ ) Proctor 
of Chelmsford, then situated partly in Chelmsford and partly in 
Acton. It seems probable that before this time it was a portion 
of the original Robbins grant of 800 acres which was said to extend 
from the North School house (Carlisle) on Lowell Street to the Acton 
line, then at the extremity of the present Frank. Wilkins farm, 
probably to the Cyrus Heald farm, now called the Detsch place. The 
Heald tavern was not in existence till 1771 and that land (Dr. 
Fremont-Smith's) was included in the Cyrus Heald farm, according to 
the boundaries given. Tne area on which the Carlisle pines stand 
also was on the Robbins grant. 

7 

The Proctors sold their property March 28, 1748 to John Robbins, 
Junior, and Sarah his wife, of Chelmsford (now Carlisle) "for 
h 300 old tenor". Here he lived in a house now entirely gone, with 
his family. His^on, Captain Aaron Robbins married Esther Heald, 
daughter of John 6 and Mary (White) Heald, Sept. 30, 1804. They had 
a son Aaron who married Martha 

Captain Aaron Robbins probably built the "new" house in 1820, 
the date marked into the plastering of the cellar way. The old 
structure was moved up the hill on Westford Street to a point 
opposite the end of Cross Street, to what was called the Haggerty 
Lot, the significance of which is now unknown. Only a well remains 
on this site to-day to indicate that any sort of a building ever 
stood there. 

Captain Aaron died in 1821 from sudden blood poisoning when 
forty years of age, the year after the house was built. It was 
designed for a tavern but seems to have spent the major part of its 
existence as a private residence. Family tradition says the tavern 
was operated by* Simon Wheeler prior to the time the Wilkins family 
took it; he must have been there sometime, perhaps all the time 
between 1821 and 1830. He had a large family, three of his thirteen 
children being triplets, one of whom lived just six hours. This 
is the only record of triplets which I have thus far found in Car- 
lisle. Lucy, one of Simon's daughters spent her later life on the 
Kirchner place on Acton Street, adjoining this farm. 

The tavern was situated on the traveled road from Groton to 
Boston and from Groton to Brighton where great droves of pigs and 
flocks of turkeys were taken to be sold. The barn 70 by 50 feet 
constructed of huge oak beams, pinned together with wooden pegs, 
could accomodate a large number of animals and vehicles, and it 
was doubtless a point of exchange for stage horses, because of its 
favorable location. 

Captain Aaron Robbins 1 widow, Esther (Heald) Robbins married 
Silas Hartwell the year following her husband's death and it seems 
unlikely that she stayed in this house. Simon Wheeler and his 



I 



family axe supposed to have come here then, kept the tavern and 
remained till the place was purchased by William Wilkins, son of 
Timothy and Lucy (Green) Wilkins whose home was on the site in the 
village center where Daisy's store now stands. 

William's parents had died and through purchase he had become 
the owner of the parental property, then apparently had sold it 
and gone to live with his family in the Samuel Green house (now 
Mrs. William Clark's) on Concord Street. About the time William's 
son Timothy was ten years old (1839 or 30) the family moved into 
this brick-end house on the corner of Acton and Westford Streets. 

For two years previous he had been buying in this property 
from the heirs of Lt. John Robbins, Jr. and Captain Aaron Robbins, 
his son, as fast as he could. Lucy, Martha and Sally, all daughters 
of John Robbins, 2nd, sold their shares to him on March 22, 1828, 
and Martha, the widow of John's grandson Aaron Robbins, conveyed 
hers to him on the same day. Moses Robbins, John Jr.'s son, had 
sold his inheritance to Reuben and Almira Foster and they sold it 
to William Wilkins also on this same date. Some of the farm lands 
had been sold by the administrator of the estate of John Robbins, 
Jr. to satisfy claims - this probably being the land Simon Wheeler 
lived upon after leaving the tavern. Cyrus Heald seems to have 
owned some part of the farm, as he conveyed it April 13, 1829 to 
William Wilkins, stating it to be the undivided fifth part of the 
land and buildings "lately owned by the Lt. John Robbins and later 
John and Mary Robbins his grandchildren" . 

There were still outstanding claims which were held by the 
heirs for nearly a quarter of a century, for Julia Foster of Fitch- 
burg, Mass., did not sell her rights to the estate till Dec. 13, 
1849, and Esther Hartwell, widow of Captain Aaron Robbins, also 
widow of Silas Hartwell, did not convey her right of dower, to- 
gether with a fifteen acre wood lot, until April 8, 1852. Even 
now it is debatable if trouble may not sometime arise as several 
of these original deeds have no statement of record in the County 
Registry. 

In this same vicinity the West school house was erected on 
land belonging to this old estate, the building being raised in 
1840 and struck by lightning and burned down, May 26, 1932, long 
years after it had been converted into a residence, and owned by 
Frank Wilkins. In this school house Mary A. Butters of Burlington 
taught school before her marriage to Thomas A. Green our townsman, 
and became a valuable citizen of Carlisle. 

William Wilkins had worked in Chelsea, Mass. when a young man 
and presumably became acquainted there with Mary Pratt, one of the 
daughters of the well known Pratt family of that place. They were 
married in Chelsea July 18, 1819 and came to Carlisle where they 
had a family of ten children, Timothy, born July 12, 1820, being 
the oldest. Only the last three were born in the brick-end house. 



William was a farmer; tie never used this house for a tavern, 
nor any other member of the Wilkins family. 

About 1849 it is certain that a Heald must have lived in this 
house also, for Hannah Heald, daughter of Cyrus and Charlotte Heald 
was there when she married Dr. Thomas Hosmer, dentist, of Bedford, 
July 7, 1849. (Dr. Hosmer made this statement to his friend, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Robbins Berry.) The house has at some period been made 
into two tenements so it is quite possible two families could be 
there at the same time, or perhaps only Miss Heald was there with 
the Wilkins family. 

When the California gold rush was on in 1849, the fever reached 
into Carlisle and at least three young men struck out for the West, 
one of whom was Timothy Wilkins (son of William) then 29 years old. 
Among the family archives are valuable receipts which show, some- 
what, the progress of this adventurous young man. By what means 
he traveled to New York and Panama it is not known, but "for $200. 
paid in full" he secured "passage in steerage of Barque Sarah from 
Panama, May 31, 1850, to San Francisco anchorage." By April 7, 1851 
he was sending home to his father 24 ounces of gold dust by the 
steamer Isthmus, and again in July of the same year he sent two 
shipments of varying amounts, by express. Meanwhile he purchased 
a "boroug" (mule) of a mouse colore Branded o e, for fifty dollars" 
which helped along in the arduous work of prospecting in Rattle- 
snake Creek. In 1853 his accumulations were transmitted to the 
Philadelphia Mint where they were converted into the coin of the 
realm. The gold panned in the California creek was used later by 
Timothy to purchase this farm from his father. 

Some of the precious dust was saved out and years later made 
by a jeweler in Lowell into a charming set of ear-rings fashioned 
with pendants and decorated with coral beads, which Timothy gave 
to his daughter Faustina. The yellow gold in these ear-rings is 
as bright and shining today as when it was washed out of the waters 
in the valley of the Sierras. One pendant has been lost, but the 
other gives us the pattern; they are so constructed that the ear- 
rings can be effectively worn without them. 

No one seems to know just when Timothy returned from Cal- 
ifornia, or by what route; it was probably about 1853. He lived 
and worked in Lowell for some time, coming to Carlisle each week- 
end, walking the distance each way on the recently constructed rail- 
road track. He was greatly interested in horticulture and enjoyed 
making special varieties of flowers grow. He planted the big horse 
chestnut tree which stands in front of the house and the rose 
bushes which grow along the roadside opposite. 

In 1^53 he married Paulina N. Robbins of Carlisle, daughter 
of John Dana 6, and Caroline (Lakin) Robbins. They took up their 
residence with his parents on the home place. Two children were 
born to them,- Paulina Augusta and Francis Ervin, who has always 
been called Frank. * 



Paulina (Robbins) Wilkins died in 1861 and Timothy married as 
his second wife, Ellen Judith Dennis Sargent of Lanesville, Mass., 
"by whom he had a daughter Ellen Faustina. 

Frank E. Wilkins now lives alone in this old "brick-end house 
with the rare S. scroll metal stays and four end chimneys. He 
rents the western tenement to Matthias Peloquin. 

The house has retained some of the characteristics of the 
early tavern. The front door with arched transom and rectangular 
side lights, was made thirty-five inches wide so that the whiskey 
"barrels could "be rolled into the hall which extends east and west, 
clear across the house. The location of the "bar is uncertain, yet 
it seems logical that it was in the front north room as the kitchen 
with its large fireplace and oven capped by a nine foot mantel is 
directly back of it. From the hall now divided by a door with a 
transom light, rises two flights of stairs, the front ones being 
constructed with comfortable rises and treads, painted in a gray 
marbelized effect, with carved scroll stair ends and square wooden 
spindles. This stairway turns with a landing about two thirds of 
the way up, leaving room beyond the petition for a second steeper 
flight ascending from the rear of the hall to the region of the 
ante-room and dance or entertainment hall. The dancing space was 
made possible by swinging back a wood paneled crossTartition between 
the two north rooms on the second floor. The last time this 
-pa-rtition was moved was in 1841 when Lizzie Wilkins (Mary Elizabeth, 
daughter of William and Mary (Pratt) Wilkins) celebrated her 
eighteenth birthday. The ante-room, a small square room opening 
out of this dance hall, used as a dressing room for the actors and 
entertainers, has a row of hooks high up, clear around the room, 
to receive the paraphernalia used by them. 

The windows upstairs have the original twelve light panes but 
downstairs the more modern four panes have been substituted. In 
the room at the left of the entrance hall there are two windows 
with stained glass borders which came from a church "over Littleton 
way" which was being repaired. These flank the brickwork of the 
closed up fireplace, the hearth of which is made of square bricks. 

Upstairs there are four open fireplaces but none down stairs 
as they have been closed to accomodate stoves. There were original- 
ly two big ovens, one at each end of the house, but only one re- 
mains. Iron latches are found throughout the house except on the 
front door. This has a knob and also a bell wired across the house 
through the hall, which rings when a second knob is pulled. The 
front door is probably not as old as the house. Nearly all of the 
floors are of wide hard pine boards and there are no exposed or 
boxed beams in the house. 

Many fascinating things can be found in this century-old 
building. On the parlor walls are Currier & Ives prints of Mt. 
Vernon, the home of Washington and one of the old Tomb where his 
body was first laid. Other rural scenes in these prints have kept 
their -places for decades. The frames made of cones of several 



• 



V 



coniferous trees arranged in patterns, carry one back to the days 
when long winter evenings were given to such "fancy work". An 
astral lamp with engraved glass globe and sparkling pendants, lure 
the eye; ruby glass dresser toilet sets and silvered glass vases 
are on the narrow mantels; blue dishes, Sandwich cup plates and 
glass decanters are in the cupboards, and countless things of 
interest hide beneath the attic roof. An old coach lantern, prob- 
ably relic of stage coach days, and a carpet bag, hang from the 
rafters. The body part of the melodion which was the first organ 
to be used in the Carlisle Unitarian Church is there too, resting 
on the stalwart arms of an old Boston rocker. This instrument, 
once fitted with a stand to bring it to a proper height, was carried 
to church each Sunday in a wagon, for a period of years, and brought 
back again after the service. It was played by Timothy Wilkins 
who played it with the help of some one to keep the bellows full. 

The Wilkins family was musical and they have been faithful 
in playing and singing for the benefit of the church and community 
for generations past. Frank Wilkins played occasio-rea^hj on the organ 
of both churches, also sang and gave impersonations and readings. 
Mary H. Robbins, sister of Paulina (Robbins) Wilkins, and a leading- 
contralto in the Father Kemp's original concert company joined in 
the family musical ensemble. One of the large back combs which she 
wore in her hair in the Father Kemp's concerts, also a copy of the 
tunes they used, can be found at the Library historical room. 

The men of this household loved nature, especially the flowers 
and birds. Frank Wilkins' gardens are annually full of beautiful 
blooms which he generously shares with all his friends. They are 
often donated to decorate the churches on Sunday mornings, after 
which they find their way to sick rooms and shut-in folks who 
greatly appreciate them. His dalhias have included rare and un- 
usual species and they seem to grow for him like magic 

He is particularly fond of the winter birds. His whistle is 
an effective means of calling great flocks of them from the leaf- 
less trees to feed from his outstretched hands, his pockets and 
even from his lips. Fifty chicadees and nuthatches have been about 
him at once, on some such occasions. His success in calling them 
reached the knowledge of Thornton Burgess the naturalist, who 
wrote him a congratulatory letter and also told over the radio of 
Mr. Wilkins' constant feeding of winter birds for fifty consecutive 
years. 

Farming is his vocation, but more aesthetic things are his 
chief interests. He should have been relieved of farm duties and 
given time to cultivate the things he loved. He would have made 
a remarkable horticulturist for plants respond surprisingly to his 
most casual care. He would have made a success of ornithology be- 
cause of his patience and faithfulness to the feathered flocks. 
He had musical ability and could imitate birds, animals or people 
and his happiness in doing all these things seems to lie mainly 
in the fact that it brings joy to others also. 



To be able to supplant nettles with dahlias and cause long 
beds of pansies to take the place of poison ivy is to bring some- 
thing of value into the e very-day world. To bring feathered 
songsters from the woods in response to a gentle call is to 
demonstrate a gift rarely endowed on nature lovers. But being 
just a farmer, Frank Wilkins gives care to both the practical and 
beautiful things and proudly keeps the old home in the Wilkins 
name, - - a name identified with it for nearly two centuries and 
with the town of Carlisle since 1739 when his ancestors, Timothy 
Wilkins and his wife Anna Smith, came here from Middleton, Mass. 



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Aviators passing over Carlise 
will have no trouble in locating 
the town by the huge letters paint- 
ed on the barn roof of Frank E. 
Wilkin's, Westforu road. The town 
will be on the map of all airmen. 

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John Robbins, Jr. 

Sax ah. 
Children: 

Lucy f 
(j£»i«ifr.) Johnf 
(Oapt.) Aaronf 
Moses f 
Sallaf 
Marthaf 



JOHN ROBBINS. JUNIOR. 

son of John 3 and Susaen-nsLO^a-TiOooa^okibi-ns. 

b. «7«« 

m. 



d.COc*. U, \«iS~ c^ed.^7- 



b. lyWo 



d. (Ddr. ZLO, ft*S ^« 



^71 



b. May 28, 1776. 

b. July 18, 1778. db. Aug. 5; ms,, -m. A-n-rra"Da.iriesr , mo. 

b. April 23, 1781, m. Esther Heald* Sept. 30, 1804. 

b. Oct. 26, 1783. -m. SaoraVi T^oc+or, 1^. XDfie.17, »*06>. 

b. March 23, 1787. dL. Cxst 3, l<0.^. 

b. April 11, 1789. -^.3e-njsL7Mi-nTbs,"Ver 1 3r. mfc ZDee.S, «'o. 



* Esther Heald, b. Jan. 21, 1783, dau. of John 6 and Mary (White) Heald. 

m. Sept. 30, 1804, Capt . Aaron Robbins 5 " 



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TIMOTHY ^WILKINS, JR. 

Timothy Wilkins^ 3 whose wife was Lucy Green, was born in 1758 
and died April 28, 1812, aged 54. He was called Timothy Wilkins, 
Junior and was the son of Timothy^and Mary (Chamberlin) Wilkins. 
When he died in 1812, he left a wife Lucy, a daughter Lucy and two 
sons, John and William. His property consisted of a house and barn 
and some land where Daisy's store now is, corner of Lowell and 
Bedford Streets; land back of the Long Block and Burying Yard, ex- 
tending back of the Barrett property to the land of Hathan Green, 
(now Ernest Wilkins place) . Lucy, his wife, was made administratrix 
June, 1812. 

Previous to this (1809) he had sold land to his brother Zadoc 
and the building now owned by Miss Hill, corner East Street and 
Bedford Street. He sold (1795) land to Deacon John Green on which 
to build the house now occupied by Mrs. Mary A. Green. 

The widow Lucy seems to have remained in the house with the 
son John who had the property, apparently. On March 14, 1817 he 
mortgaged all he had for $600. to his brother William and sister 
Lucy. This consisted of two acres of land and part of dwelling 
and part of barn, the land near the burying ground, the "Munroe 
Lot" and another piece of seven acres. Thj3 mortgage was to be paid 
by April 1, 1818. He failed to do this and^tne oroperty was sold 
by sheriff's sale Nov. 17, 1819 to William Wilkins for $320. 

The widow Lucy (Green) Wilkins made her will June 13, 1821, and 
died August 18, 1821. The will was probated Oct. 2, 1821. She 
left a large Bible to each of her three children and to William a 
clock, bed and bedding and one silver tablespoon. To Lucy (then 
Mrs. Cyrus Blanchard) all wearing apparel, one bed and bedding, all 
linen except a pair of sheets and a pair of pillow cases to each 
bed mentioned; also a warming pan and 8 teaspoons and "my necklace" 
which later was spoken of as a gold one, probably beads. 
To a grand-daughter Mary Wilkins (daughter of John and Sarah 
(Andrews) Wilkins) she left a bed to be kept for her till she was 
21 or until she got married. 

All the rest to be equally divided between William and Lucy. She 
had no real estate. 

Thomas Heald, John Jacobs and Leonard Green made the inventory of 
her estate which amounted to $619.71 Nov. 20, 1821. 

Lucy(Wilkins) Blanchard received her legacy, April 8, 1822, 
and it was valued at $124.71. 

On April 27, 1822 Cyrus and Lucy (Wilkins) Blanchard of 
Charlestown, Mass., sold their rights in their mother's dower 
(buildings and land) to William Wilkins for $120. Daniel Wheat and 
wife Betty sold their rights (an undivided 3rd part of the reversion 
to the right of dower of Lucy Wilkins) for $200. on April , 1822. 

On July 26, 1828 Cyrus and Lucy (Wilkins) Blanchard of Charles- 
town, Mass., sold a piece of orchard land and one of wood land back 
of the burying ground for $75. to William Wilkins . CL>-^-tkuu <*-£ txroT^- 



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All this appears to have been the entire (?) property of 
Timothy and Lucy" (Green) Wilkins. There is the possibility that 
the land on which the present James H. Wilkins house stands, also 
belonged to the Timothy Wilkins, Jr. estate. Only deeds can verify 
this supposition. 

The original papers to which this article refers are in the 
possession of Mr. Frank E. Wilkins of Carlisle. 
Will of Lucy (Green) Wilkins. 
Inventory of Lucy (Green) Wilkins 1 estate. 
Deeds (except those spoken of in paragraph 2) . 



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JOHN WILKINS 7 



l(s> 



Lieut, and Captain. 

John Wilkins?, son of Timothy and Lucy (Green) Wilkins, 

b. Dec. 2, 1788, d. April 10, 1825, aged 36. 
m. Jan. 2, 1810, Sarah Andrews, dau. of 
Edmund and Millicent (Barrett) Andrews, * 
b. April t), 1788, d. May 23, 1861, aged 72. 



b. April 21, 1811, d. Aug. 25, 1871, unm. 
b. April 23, 1816, d. July 6, 1848, unm. 
b. Jan. 25, 1819, d. Jan. 31, 1819. 



Children: 


1. 


< 

John Bray 


2. 


Mary, 


3. 


Timothy, 


4. 


Eliza, 



b. Jan. 20, 1820, d. 



m. 



and went to Vermont 



ii> 



Timothy Wilkins ' 



Children: 
1. John 



2. 
3. 
4. 



TIMOTHY WILKINS (s . 

son of Timothy- and Mary (Chamberlin) Wilkins 
b. Sept. 2, 1758, d. April 28, 1812, aged 54. 
m. Jan. 24, 1788, Lucy Green, dau. 



Lucy , 
Mary?, 
William 7 , 



b. Dec. 2, 1788; Lieut, and Captain.' 
d. April 10, 1825. tw Sarrsth A-v*dL-r-eaJs. 

b. Jan. 26, 1790, m. Cyrus Blanchard 
b. Sept. 27, 1791, aL.-Wovr- (^ \<Z\X 

b. Dec. 20, 1794, d. March 23, 1857. 
m. Mary Pratt. 







I 



17 



3Zir 

WILLIAM WILKINS family. 

■*j , 

William Wilkins, son of Timothy, Jr. and Lucy (Green) Wilkins, 

b. Carlisle, Dec. 20, (22, Bible record) 1794, 
d. March 23, 1857, Carlisle, 
m. Chelsea, Mass., July 18, 1819, Mary Pratt, 
b. July 3, 1797 d. Sept. 19, 1863, dau. of 
Caleb and Mary (ingraharn) Pratt of Chelsea, 
Mass. (see p. 47 "Pathway of the Pilgrims"). 



Ten children, all born in Carlisle: - 



Timothy Wilkins, 



b. July 12, 1820, d. May 2, 1900, 
farmer, loved flowers, 
m. (1st) Paulina N. R6b"bins,>nax5-l*53- 
b. -*naaj A<?, 1832 , d. -vr>»y 31, 1861, 
Carlisle (dau. of aTolrnDssnsrRoJabiTis} 



They had: 



1. Paulina Augusta Wilkins, b. 3)ec. I, ISsh. 

m. (&&\a. t i%TI, &ha.s. A Cann 

2. Francis Ervin Wilkins, b.>iot/: sm, \15% u.-n-m. 
(Always called Frank) d. 

Mar ried( second) Ellen Judith Dennis Sargent of Lanesville, Mass. 

b. Jan. as; 1835, d. Feb. 2, 1888. 

They had: 

3. Ellen Faustina Wilkins, b. Carlisle, April JS". '^H-. 

d. Carlisle, Oct. 14, 1903, unm. 

Twins ^ ■ 

II. (George Washington Wilkins, b. Dec. 4, 1821, d. Dec. 5, 1821. 
III. (Andrew^Jackson Wilkins, b. Dec 4, 1821, d. Oct. 30, 1901, 

at Beverly, Mass., aged 79. He was 
a short man, too short to be ac- 
cepted in the Civil War. 
m. Hannah 



Children: 

1 . Eva M. 

2. Manilla Theresa, 

3. A. Laura, 

4. Philip S., 



m. 
m. 
m. 



Collins . 
Pierce. 
DeLung. 



b. 

d. Jan. 21, 1931, Lynn, Mass, 

m. Nellie M. 

Children: Marion, Mildred E. 



1% 



IV. Mary ELiaabath Wiikina, b. Sept. 21 , T823, d. March 6, Tgt5 
J m. AM jah Warren Munroe, April 23, 

I854(, whose father Reuben? spelled 
his name Monro;© • Belonged to the 
Colonial Monroe family of Lexington, 
Mass.) He was b. July 25, t826, d. 
Jan. t9, 1668. 

Children r- Charles Warren, Willie 
Augustus and George Henry. 
She.®*®-?- adopted Ethel Green Blaisdell, 
(b. March t881 , Carlisle) (dau. of 
Arthur C. and Abbie( Adams) Blaisdell 
of Carlisle) and took the name of 
Ethel Green Munroe. (Adoption papers 
Hd. Midd. 26382). She married 
Christopher E. Crosaland and had 
Jessie, Doris, and Edward. 
<g- 

V. William Lafayette Wilkins, b. Dee. 28, 1825 , Carlisle, and 

d. March 27, t883 at Fitswllliam,N.H. 
and buried in So. Chelmsford, Mass. 
Blacksmith . 

m. Paulina R. Niekles of Carlisle, 
dau. Yamum and Ruhamah( Proctor) 
Blood Nlckles. b. March 28, T834 in 
Carlisle; d. Dec. 6, t899, Lexington, 
Mass., buried in So. Chelmsford. 

They had: 

1. Fred Wilkins, Fitchburg, Mass. 

2. Arthur V. Wilkins, Fitswilllam, H. H. 

3. Louise W. ('m. Fletcher) Pawtucket, R. I. 

4. Fanny W. (m. Hannum ) Bristol Conn. 

5. Walter Wilkins, b. d. July 9, t924, 

Lexington , Mass . 

6. Charles Irving Wilkins, b. 

d. Oct. 9, t92t, 
Fitswilliam, N.H. 

VI. Edward Everett Wilkins, b. Nov. 23, t82?, Carlisle, Mass. 

d. May 22, t894, Carlisle, 

m. Bridget H. Noon, b. June 17,t83T 

in Ireland; d. June 9, T9t5, Carlisle 



They had: 



■=1 
1. George Everett Wilkins, 



b. 

m. Carlisle, Nov. 28, t894, 

Alice L. Robbins, dau. Daniel 

W. and Lizaie( Wilson) Robbins 

b. 

d. 



n 



Children:- Evelyn, b. 
Viola , b. 

m. Prank Parsons 

2. Ida Caroline Wilkins, b. t86t, Carlisle, 

d. July 7, t^tt, aged 50, Carlisle 
unmarried. 

eg 

VII. Henry Clay ITilkins, b. Dec 23 » 1829, Carlisle, died in 

Albany, N. Y. (;?) Dee. 25, W4. 

VIII. Augustus Wilkins b. Carlisle. Mareh 17, t832, 

d. May 3t, 1891, Carlisle; aged 59 y. 
2m. t7 d. buried in Carlisle. 

m. Hannah Til ton. 
^ eh; ^ loT-a. £. fc -mscr, to - 1*^3. 

IX. Caleb Ingrahaia Wilkins ,b. Carlisle, May 4, T834, 

d. Dee. 28, t89T, at Brooklyn, IT. Y. 

m. Philura P. Kenney. She was b. 

Barnston, P. Q. about T834 

d. Oet. 24, 1910 at Barnston, P. Q. 

aged 76 yrs. 

No Children. 

X. Caroline Matilda Wilkins, b. June T7, 1836, Carlisle, 

d. Oet. 20, t875, unmarried. She 
lived in Lowell and worked in the 
mill. Died in Carlisle. 






So 



Family of ABIJAH WARREN MONROE. 

Abijah War ren fe Monroe, b. July 25, 1836; d. Jan. 19, 1868. 
Mary Elizabeth*Wilkins, b. Sept. 31, 1833; d. March 6, 1915, 

m. April 33, 1854. 

Abijah Warren Monroe belongedto the Colonial Munroe family of 
Lexington, Mass., and his^fa£her spelled the name Munroe. 

Children: 

1. Charles Warren Monroe, b. May 10, 1856.) 

3. Willie Augustus Monroe, b. May 19, 1856.) twins - 

3. George Henry Monroe, b. Jan. 5, 1866. 

Charles Warren Monroe died March 4, 1879, aged 33 yrs. 

9 mos . , 34 days . 

Willie Augustus Monroe died Feb. 33, 1832, aged 35 yrs., 

9 mos . , 13 days . 

George Henry Monroe died Sept. 30, 1890, aged 24 yrs., 

8 mos. , 15 days . 

Sfegafr adopted Ethel Green Blaisdell, b. March lie, 188.$, Carlisle, 
daughter of Arthur C. and Abbie (Adams) Blaisdell of Carlisle, 
and took the name of Ethel Green Monroe. She married Christopher 
E. Crossland and had Jessie, Doris and Edward. 



or 



I 



3/ 



« 



WILKINS PROBATE NUMBERS. 
WILLIAM and MARY (PRATT) WILKINS family. 



William Wilkins 

Timothy Wilkins 

E. Faustina Wilkins 

Bridget N. Wilkins 

Henry 01 ay Wilkins 

Caroline M. Wilkins 

Caleb Ingraham Wilkins 

Andrew Jackson Wilkins 

Philip S. Wilkins 

Edward E. Wilkins 

Ida C. Wilkins 

William Lafayette Wilkins 

Walter W. Wilkins 

Mary E, Monroe 

Ethel G. Monroe 



Probate - 



Middlesex 44762 (0. S.) 


i» 


53361 


it 


63613 


it 


105953 




No administration 


it 


11839 




No administration 


Essex 


89276 


Middlesex 37557 


n 


89908 




No administration 


it 


147773 


it 


103499 


it 


26382 Adoption 



The above information was furnished by Allen N. Swain, Counsellor 
at Law and Conveyancer, 58 School Street, Dedham, Mass. 



Simon Wheeler, b. 

d. Oct. 21, 1851, aged 40, within 3 months of 

Nov. 11, 1851, Probate No. Middlesex 44381 (O.S.) 



Left heirs: - 



Mother 

sister, Lucy W. 

Brother 



Executor: - 



John Jacobs 



(1 



aa. 



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•^.6 



A Dialogue. 

BETWEEN MAN AND THE OLD TALL CLOCK. 
J. Stanley. 



Clock. 
Here I stand so faithful and true 
Telling the hours and moments to you; 
Then why not pattern take by me 
And serve thy God as I serve thee? 

Man. 
Faithful and true we know you've been 
Yet still at times you err and sin 
By going too fast, sometimes too slow, 
And other times refusing to go. 

Clock. 
Yes, who's to "blame - is it you or I? 
When a drop of oil you won't supply 
But let me run ten years or more, 
Till all my joints are very sore. 

Man. 

Yes, it's our neglect sometimes, we know, 
But when you stop and refuse to go, 
We tell the Doctor he must call in 
And see what ails your works within. 

Clock. 
Yes, when he diognoses my case 
And puts my parts again in place, 
He thinks it is a sin and shame 
To try and lay on me the "blame. 

Man. 
You dear old clock, you're in the right, 
And may you still both day and night, 
Point out the time as moments fly, 
To warn us that our end draws nigh. 



Poem tacked on the door of the tall clock owned by Frank 
Wilkins and formerly the property of his grandfather 
William Wilkins. 
The clock was made by Edwards of Acton, Mass. 



r 



£¥ 



THE MELODION. 

The first reed instrument ever to go into 
the First Parish Church was a inelodion owned 
by Timothy Wilkins who lived in the brick-end 
house at the corner of Acton Street and the 
old Groton Road, now called Westford Street. 
It is now in this house and owned by Mr. Frank 
E. Wilkins, son of Timothy. 

Before this melodion was used, there was a "local orchestry" 
which functioned for some time in both churches, but eventually 
some discords arose and it was disbanded. 

The melodion was brought to church each Sunday when the family 
went to worship and was brought back when they returned home. This 
was done countless times. 

This instrument has four octaves with very short keys, the 
keyboard being located far back on the top of the rectangular 
surface. Bellows were located beneath it which were filled with 
air by a second person who pumped it from the side. The entire 
arrangement rested upon a stand or table made to fit the top. The 
bellows when being filled caused the keyboard and top surface to 
tilt first to the right then to the left, but when fully inflated, 
by steady pumping it could be kept fairly stationary. The stand 
is now gone, having been used for other purposes. 

Mr. Timothy Wilkins played the melodion for the services and 
also had much enjoyment from it at home. It was also used many 
times in the Lowell Jail when Miss Maria Robbins and Mrs. Henry 
Spaulding sang there for the services for the inmates. They each 
had powerful voices and brought much cheer to those who could not 
otherwise attend church services. These two ladies sang in the 
Carlisle Congregational Church. 

The box in which the melodion came at the time it was bought, 
has on the inside cover a pasted label bearing these words: 

Abraham Prescott & Son 

Manufacturers of Serapldnes and Melodions 

Premium Bass and Double Bass Viols 

and dealers in 

Musical Instruments, 

Umbrellas, Parasols, etc. etc. 

Instruments and Umbrellas repaired at > short notice, 

and warranted. 
Opposite the Columbia'oHotel, Concord, N. H. 



Care should be taken in blowing the melodion to give 
a steady pressure, as a sudden motion will produce an 
uneven tone. 

E.B. Tripp, Printer, Concord, N.H. 
T. Wilkins, Lowell, Mass. 






41 



1? 



I 



^^ 



Mr. Frank Wilkins says this instrument was in working order 
when he was a small child. Its use in the church was discontinued 



before he was born, 
church. 



His father, Timothy Wilkins played it at the 





/* t 


MS 


*/ 


Ay 


*** 


X»x 


r/l 














*s 


/i 


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(jOTZ*-3 






fli 



<D 



A Right to a Church Horseslied. Copy. 

Know all men by these presents that the First Religious Society 
of Carlisle in consideration of $22_J*3 (twenty-two and forty three 
one hundreds dollars) paid to said Society "by Timothy Wilkins, 
have assigned to said Timothy Wilkins one Horse Shed No. 2 said 
Timothy Wilkins to have the exclusive use of the same whenever he 
may have occasion to occupy it, and shall also have the right to 
transmit the same to his heirs or assigns who may at the time he 
active members of said Society, but to no others. 

Whereas whenever said Timothy Wilkins shall by death, removal, 
resignation or otherwise cease to be a member of said Society with- 
out having assigned or transferred his right to some other member 
of said Society, then all his right and privilege shall revert back 
to, and become absolutely vested in the said Society. 

In testimony whereof we have hereto set our hand and seal this 
14th day of April, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-one. 

L. M. Green 

H. W. Wilson) Parish Committee. 

M. Lee 



The above Timothy Wilkins was son of William Wilkins 
b. Jan. 25, 1819; d. May 2, 1900. 



(1 



FRANK E . WILKINS line, 



I 


Bray Wilkins 


1610 


- 1701-2, ] 


aarr 


II 


Thomas Wilkins 


1647 


- 1717, 


(i 


III 


Isaac Wilkins 


1690 


— 


ii 


IV 


Timothy Wilkins 


1709 


- /7Tf 


« 


V 


Timothy Wilkins 


1733 


- 1820 


n 


VI 


Timothy Wilkins 


1758 


- 1812 


ii 


VII 


William Wilkins 


1794 


- 1857 


it 


VIII 


Timothy Wilkins 


1819 


- 1900 


a 


IX 


Frank E. Wilkins 









married Anna Gingell 



Hannah Nichols 

Anna (Wilkins) Foster 

Anna Smith 

Mary Chamberlain 

Lucy Green 

Mary Pratt 

Paulina N. Robbins 



GEORGE E. WILKINS line. 



I Bray Wilkins 

II Thomas Wilkins 

III Isaac Wilkins 

IV Timothy Wilkins 

V Timothy Wilkins 

VI Timothy Wilkins 

VII William Wilkins 

VIII Edward Wilkins 

IX George E. Wilkins 



1610 


- 1701-2, 


married 


Anna Gingell 


1647 


- 1717 


ii 


Hannah Nichols 


1690 


— 


« 


Anna (Wilkins) Foster 


1709 


- qv 


it 


Anna Smith 


1733 


- 1820 


it 


Mary Chamberlain 


1758 


- 1812 


ii 


Lucy Green 


1794 


- 1857 


ii 


Mary Pratt 


1827 


- 1894 


it 


Bridget Noon 


ns 




ii 


Alice Robbins 



n 






3£ I 



JOHN BRAY WILKINS line 



I Bray Wilkins 1610 

II Thomas Wilkins 1647 

III Isaac Wilkins 1690 

IV Timothy Wilkins 1709 

V Timothy Wilkins 1733 

VI Timothy Wilkins 1758 

VII John Wilkins 1789 

VIII John Bray Wilkins 1811 



1701-2, 
1717 



1820 
1812 
1825 
1871 



married Anna Gingell 
" Hannah Nichols 
" Anna (Wilkins) Foster 
" Anna Smith 
" Mary Chamberlain 
" Lucy Green 
" Sarah Andrews 

unmarried; resident of 

Carlisle, lived on the 

H. L. C. Green place. 



ANDREW WILKINS line. 



I 


Bray Wilkins 


1610 


- 1701-2, ] 


aarr 


II 


Thomas Wilkins 


1647 


- 1717 


h 


III 


Isaac Wilkins 


1690 


— 


n 


IV 


Timothy Wilkins 


1709 


- 


n 


V 


Timothy Wilkins 


1733 


- 1820 


u 


VI 


James Wilkins 


1767 


- 1825 


ii 


VII 


George Wilkins 






ii 


III 


Andrew Wilkins 




- 1922 


n 



married Anna Gingell 

Hannah Nichols 

Anna (Wilkins) Foster 

Anna Smith 

Mary Chamberlain 

Hannah Brown 
1 2nd) Almira SpauldingBahaMati 
,1st) Adora West 
L 2nd) Lizzie Ford 



G 






a 



SIMON WHEELER family. 

Simon Wheeler, son of 

b. d. 

m. Abigail Blood, Jan. 24, 1799, 
b. d. 



Children: - 


















1. 


Abigail, 


b. 


Aug. 


16 


1799, 


d. 


Sept. 


13, 


1819. 


2. 


Sarah, 


b. 


Aug. 


5' 


, 1301, 










3. 


Lucy, 


b. 


Mar. 


30 


, 1805, 










4. 


Rebecca, 


b. 


Oct. 


19 


, 1806, 










5. 


David, 


b. 


Mar. 


10 


, 1808, 


d. 


Oct. 


24, 


1817. 


6. 


Moses, 


b. 


Nov. 


4 


, 1809, 










7. 


Simon, 


b. 


Oct. 


7 


, 1811, 


d. 


Oct, 


31, 


1851. 


8. 


Betsy, 


b. 


Apr. 


24 


, 1813, 


d. 


Oct. 


24, 


1891. 


9. 


Hannah, 


b. 


Sept 


.27 


, 1814, 


d. 


Nov. 


1, 


1817. 


10. 


Mary Ann, 


b. 


Sept 


.12 


, 1816, 


d. 


Oct. 


31, 


1817. 


(11. 


David, 


b. 


Feb. 


11 


, 1819, 


d. 


same 


day, 


lived 6 hrs 


Triplets (12. 


Hannah, 


b. 


Feb. 


11 


, 1819, 










(13. 


Mary Ann, 


b. 


Feb. 


11 


, 1819, 











Simon Wheeler was a Minute Man and received a bounty of 18 
shillings which the District of Carlisle voted to pay in considera- 
tion of serving as such, vote August 29, 1794. (see Bull's History 
of Carlisle, p. 45) 



Lucy Wheeler lived on the Kirchner place, Acton Street, above 
Frank Wilkins' and doubtless this was the Simon Wheeler farm. 
They owned land which was later the Porter place on Cross Street 
which went through the land court (about 1930). Apparently it was 
sold by Simon Wheeler, Jr. to William Wilkins and it descended 
through Elizabeth (Wilkins) Munroe to Mrs. Ethel (Munroe) Crossland 
who sold it to James and Nellie Porter. 



f) 



r 



Simon Wheeler, 
Abigail Blood, 

married Jan. 24, 1799 

Children: - 



WHEELER 



3o 



Duren records 



Abigail Wheeler, 
Sarah Wheeler, 
Lucy Wheeler, 
Rebecca Fneeler, 
David Wheeler, 
Hoses Wheeler, 
Simon Wheeler, 
Betty Wheeler, 
Hannah Wheeler, 
Mary Ann Wheeler, 
Hannah Wheeler, 



Mary Ann Wheeler, 



\ 



b. 


Aug. 


16, 


1799, 


d. 


Sept. 


13, 


1819 


b. 


Aug. 


5, 


1801, 










b. 


Mar. 


30, 


1805, 










b. 


Oct. 


19, 


1806, 










b. 


Mar. 


10, 


1808, 


d. 


Oct. 


24, 


1817 


b. 


Nov. 


4, 


1809, 










b. 


Oct. 


7, 


1811, 


d. 


Oct. 


21, 


1851 


b. 


Apr. 


24, 


1313, 


d. 


Oct. 


24, 


1891 


b. 


Sept 


.27, 


1814, 


d. 


Nov. 


1, 


1817 


b. 


Sept 


.12, 


1816, 


d. 


Oct. 


31, 


1817 



David Wheeler, ) 



triplets, b. Feb. 11, 1819 
David d. Feb. 11, 1819 



Nathan Wheeler, 

Ruth Hunt of Westford, m. at Concord, 
married Nov. 16, 1785, at Concord. 

Children: - 



Nathan Fneeler, 
Amos Wheeler, 
Ruth Wheeler, 
Betsey Wheeler, 
Abel Wheeler, 
Sally Wheeler, 
Patty Wheeler, 
Daniel Wheeler, 
Fanny Wheeler, 



b. Aug. 6 

b. Jan. 22 

b. Mar. 22 

b. June 15 

b. June 10 

b. Dec. 22 

b. Feb. 17 

b. May 26 

b. Feb. 16 



1786 

1788 

1789 

1790, m. Wm. Raymond 

1791 

1792 

1795 

1796 

1803 



William Wheeler, 
Sarah, 

married 



Children: - 

Lucy Clementine Wheeler, b. Oct. 21, 1819 
Ansil Wheeler, b. May 14, 1817 



3/ 



Reuben Wheeler, Id. Acton, June 28, 1768 
Hepzibah Heywood, b. Acton, June 15, 1768 
married Oct. SO, 1789 

Children: - 



Itharnar Wheeler, 
John Heywood Wheeler, 
Elijah Wheeler, 
Nancy Fneeler, 
Eunice Wheeler, 
Reuben Wheeler, 
Franklin Wheeler, 
Betsey Wheeler, 
Mary Wheeler, 



b. 


April 


25, 


1791 


b. 


April 


30, 


1792 


b. 


Sept. 


21, 


1793 


b. 


March 


27, 


1795 


b. 


April 


23, 


1797, 


b. 


Jan. 


29, 


1799 


b. 


March 


4 


1802 


b. 


May 


31, 


1803 


b. 


Sept. 


29, 


1804 



"HenryTl^sFr. >'-nt."ho^5>)«lf- 



<l 



3£ 



WHEELER. 



Nehemiah Wheeler, 








Susanna , b. 




d. 


June 28, t?86 


married 








Children r- 








Samuel Wheeler, 


b. 


Act on , 


June 27, t748 


Jacob Wheeler , 


b. 


n 


March 17 , 1750 


Rachel Wheeler-, 


b. 


n 


June 50, t752 


Joseph Proctor Wheeler, 


b. 


it 


Hot. 29, t754 


Rebekah Wheeler, 


b. 


it 


March 6, T759 


Susanna Wheeler, 


b. 


n 


June t5, %T62 


Joanna Wheeler, 


b. 


it 


Nov. tt, t7<54 




m. 




Simeon Wilson 


Olive Wheeler, 


b. 


»i 


July 20, T767 




m. 




Peter Barker 


Samuel Wheel er» 








Lydia, 








married 









Children: - 

Nehemiah Wheeler, b. 

Isaac Wheeler, b. 

Susanna Wheeler, b. 

Lydia Wheeler, b. 



March T6, T780 

April 6, T785 

Jan. 11, T778 

March 3, t782 



d. Jan, 14 ( 



Joseph Proctor Wheeler, 

Betty 4 {Bette) , Munroe, 

married 

Children: - 

Sarah Wheeler, 
Polly Wheeler, 
Susanna Wheeler, 

C Martha )Pattee Wheeler, 

Silas Wheeler, 
Joseph Wheeler, 



b. Nov. 29, t754, son of Nehemiah and 
Susanna Wheeler. 

b. dau. of Joseph' and 

Hannah { ) Munroe- 



b. Aug. 12, 1781 

b. May 30, t783 

b. July t3, 1785- <i. Carlisle, April 5- 

t875. in. Nathaniel Hutchinson 

b. July 23, 1T87- m. Jacob Blaisaell, 

October T2, t809 

b. June 8, 1790 

b. Oct. 2, 1795 



33 1 









^O-Bja^J^ O-ccaL '^fa-^i^oaJct-. C ") ^y^Ltn^Jzjyt- , KB. ^U3uxr~ eudtcJre. &JL**J~*xl2~ 

u!l, 3&ul lE^yr^ud^^. 'Hie GvnLP^ cL-TVurr. H- !¥&<} ; -6U, ^- QdhjdJl^- K33, 

5", (QJZt^e*,, 3iJtcL- Jr. W*^|<2,~ ly^iL, "T^ , 7f O^T^-oJ^ CLcAir^.. 

<b. "Eju^iaJoJL, Jr. ~yUaLtJ Acf-iy?^ ct .~VLcou^3^-i^(si- 
1, KESLau^xSLu, Jr. OJ^Jdl ly-fyTG, o^ . (P^&, __ 

a, ^cx^uzJi^- Akae. 17-/7?^ dL-iyisi 






( 



3^ 



JAMES H. WILKINS HOUSE 
A WILKINS HOMESTEAD 
Bedford Road 

Results of Research by Ruth C. Wilkins 

Historical Sketch by Martha F. Wilkins 

Wilkins Lineal Record 

James H. (9) Wilkins Line 

Bohonon Family 

James Warren (7) Wilkins Family 

James Warren (8) Wilkins Family 

James Harry (9) Wilkins Family 

James Harry Wilkins 

George Gilbert (9) Wilkins Line 

George Warren (8) Wilkins Family 

Varnum (8) Wilkins Family 

William (8) Wilkins Family 

Wilkins Deeds 




r 



■ 






THE fflLKIHS HOMESTEAD 



1 



fc 



The central and original part of the house now 
owned and occupied "by James Harry Vilkins was probably built 
"by his great grandfather, James Vilkins , during the year 1789 
on land "belonging to that first James's father, Timothy 
Vilkins the second. 

James became of age in 1789 and his name appeared 
on the poll tax list of .February 2d in the Town Records. Also 
he was married on April 9th, 1789, to hannah Brown of Concord. 
On the list of those assessed for taxes that year on November 
9th, 1789, in addition to his usual taxes, Timothy Jr., James's 
father, was assessed an added amount for real estate as follows: 
"Timothy Vilkins Junr. for the Estate Improved by James Vilkins' 

On the next assessment of January 27th, 1790, James 
who the previous year was assessed for a poll tax only, began 
to be taxed for personal property too. jtiis personal property 
tax increased each year until he was paying more for that than 
his father -p^his uncle, Lt . Isaac, which would seem to indicate 
that James had become a householder. 

He was first assessed for real estate eight years 
later on ITov ember 29th, 1797, but the arrangement with the 
assessors whereby he was then taxed is not a matter of record, 
for the first deed to James was made in 1804 and not recorded 
until 1814. In "that document his father, Timothy, deeded to 
him several parcels of land including one "upon which James's 
dwelling house stands". 

Inasmuch as the house was already constructed in 
1804, and Timothy began to be assessed in 1789 for "Property 
Improved by James", who became of age and was married that 
year, it is assumed that James "improved" his father's estate 
by building a house upon it then. The ownership of -James's 
dwelling house" is recorded through the generations to the 
present owner, so that it is felt that the James Harry Wilkins 
house was built in 1789. 



(}LU£ hCZ&L^* 






- ' - - , 

-- .' -■ ,-u ' i - B - t Oil-' 



f C .- - 

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